New Project Update 20th March 2003

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New project (title page)

Update 3rd November 2002
Update 1st December 2002
Update 25th September 2002
Update 1st January 2003
Update 9th January 2003
Update 19th February 2003

The engine management loom is now nearly complete. All I need to do is crimp on the Amp terminals for the connectors. I will hopefully borrow a tool to do this.

My panels (boot, bonnet and front panel) are at the fibreglass shop having moulds and then final items made. I can then make the mounts for them on the chassis.

In the meantime I have stripped down the chassis for final welding and work. I am doing all the jobs that I could not do when the car was built. While I stripped the car I was checking I had the correct length bolts, if not I was making a note of the required size. Welding the frame is difficult trying to get into do every weld.

I will have to reassemble certain parts of the car to make the mounts for the panels.

I also weighed the bare chassis / roll cage / spaceframe. 155 kgs.

I am also taking in small parts for anodising, plating and powder coating. Hopefully the company that is doing these will be able to handle the blasting and powder coating of the main chassis.

There are 15 pictures on this page, posted 19th February 2003




This is the layout for the engine management wiring loom. First I made
a dummy loom out of rope on the vehicle. This was then transferred
to the bench.

 

I then drew out all the junctions, lengths (actual size) and what wires were required
at each terminal. The information gave size of wire, colour and where it was going
to or from.

 



I then layed out all the wires using the information drawn out on the bench
and diagrams supplied by Weber Alpha.

 



The number of wires made the loom quite complicated. Masking tape kept them all in position.

 



Once I had all the wires layed out I measured the size of the bundles so
I knew what size heat shrink I would require. This also told me the size of the
breakouts.

 

I then had to thread each wire through the sleeving.
I worked from the middle of the loom.

 

Many places in the loom required me to join many wires together,
to distribute power or combine earths. For these I turned up a small
brass tube and soldered the wires in place. Adhesive lined heat
shrink then sealed the joint.

 

These show two breakouts formed. Below is the unshrunk breakout.
These are 45 degree, 90 degree are also available. I only used these
expansive items (£10 each) when wires left the main loom.

 

For other splits in the loom such as before this 7 way plug
(used for plugging in the programming computer) I used heat lined heat shrink.

 

When stripping down the car I checked the requirements for each bolt.
This picture shows the bolts to hold in the master cylinders. They required
cutting down and drilling for lockwire (unmodified bolt top left). I like to have as
much smooth shank as possible and absolutely hate having excess thread sticking
out. Its extra weight, makes assembly and disassembly longer, especially if the
thread exposed threads get damaged.

 

The boot in filler. It is a double curvature panel and Robin has done a good
job getting it smooth.

 

The front panel. The hockey sticks are made from MDF and are longer so
when I have my dropped front bumper there is no gap. The top chrome
and grill opening edge chrome are part of the panel.

 

The finished front panel, painted with some left over paint.

 

Close up of the panel. We will paint the items originally chrome in silver.

 

The boot finished in paint. Looks good!

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